8 Reasons to Avoid Buying a Timeshare Vacation

  • By Primo Management Group
  • 19 Jun, 2017

Are you interested in buying a timeshare vacation? We're telling you why you should think twice. 

Have you been thinking about buying a timeshare vacation? While it may seem like a good idea, there are a number of reasons why getting a timeshare could lead to trouble.

Some things that come to mind are expensive yearly maintenance costs and the depreciation in value after buying the timeshare. If you're still not convinced, keep reading to learn about our top eight reasons why you should rethink buying a timeshare vacation.

You're Forced to Vacation at the Same Spot Every Year

Who are these people who love to go to the same place every year  for their vacation? You may prefer to travel and see new places around the country or even internationally.

So purchasing a timeshare would make little sense to you. Even if you have a great time at that particular resort, you are unlikely to enjoy doing the same exact activities the next season and the season after.

You also never know if the weather will stay the same in future years. Your sunny afternoons at the beach may turn into clouds and rain. By going to the same place year in and year out, you will lose out on the excitement of visiting new locations.

The Value of Owning a Timeshare Vacation is Subpar

Sometimes timeshares may cost as much as $20,000 for a one-week vacation. Be sure to check out how much the property would cost if it were a private sale.

Take a look at the local real estate sales in the area and compare it with the timeshare cost. Often you'll find out that the value of owning a timeshare is inadequate.

The resale value of a timeshare is also often much less than what you originally pay for it. A timeshare vacation will actually depreciate in value over the years.

It may not be worth it to buy a timeshare solely due to the poor overall value .

You're Predicting you can Take the Same Vacation Week Years into the Future

You are committing your time when buying a timeshare in such a way that is nearly impossible to anticipate.

You can't predict the future. You don't have a crystal ball to tell you that you'll take the same exact week for vacation for the next decade.

You never know if your job will allow it or if you are in the middle of switching jobs and can’t take that week off. you also never know if you might get sick and become unable to travel or possibly have an unexpected funeral to attend.  

Life brings many curve balls our way that makes predicting a vacation five or ten years into the future nearly impossible.

You're Committing to Pay Money well into the Future

When buying a timeshare vacation, the buyer is committing to make payments on the timeshare for years into the future. Yet, you never know if you'll be able to afford the same payments after three or four years.  

You never know if you might lose your job or face a very large expense such as covering high out-of-pocket medical costs.

Your family may face unexpected expenses and pay the cost of a timeshare may seem more frivolous. In fact, yearly vacations may become more of a luxury if you are undergoing financial troubles.

Committing to pay money into the future may not be the best bet since you never know where your financials will stand even five years from now.

You will Need to Cover More than Only Mortgage Payments

It's likely that you wouldn't be able to buy a timeshare right off the bat and will need to get a bank loan to pay off a mortgage.  However, you'll soon find that you are required to pay for more than just the mortgage.

Read your timeshare contract and you will find that you have to pay for property taxes, maintenance fees, utilities, and special assessments.

Monthly maintenance fees and per stay fees could lead to very high annual expenses. These costs may even cover the majority of lodging at a very nice hotel instead of staying at a timeshare.

Timeshare Resale Scams DO Exist!

Since selling timeshares tends to be difficult,  a large number of scam artists have been known to sell themselves off as timeshare resale brokers.

These brokers can tell you that they have a buyer interested And could direct the sale. However, they usually charge very high upfront fees and then fail to actually sell your timeshare.

Yet, not all resale brokers are scam artists. Additionally,  some states have enacted laws that try to crack down on these scam artists .

Nonetheless, you will need to be very vigilant to avoid falling into one of these scams. This is a major reason why buying a timeshare vacation may just be one too many hassles.

Renting out your Timeshare Won't be Easy

You can't count on the option to rent out your timeshare to someone else. Even though many timeshare contracts allow you to rent out the location,  this won't be easy to accomplish.

The issue may be that there are more timeshares available to rent and fewer people looking to rent them. Also, some contracts won't actually allow you to rent out your timeshare.

Other contracts may place restrictions on the type of renting agreement you're allowed.  Essentially, don't expect that renting your timeshare will be a piece of cake.

Booking a Hotel Room or Renting Lodging may be Cheaper

While many people may think that buying a timeshare is a great investment, the high costs and extra fees such as maintenance payments or taxes could make it unaffordable.

You may find that renting lodging or booking a hotel room at another Resort could be cheaper than buying a timeshare.

We hope you have enjoyed reading the top eight reasons why you might want to avoid buying a timeshare. Let us know what you think in the comments below!

And if you have any questions about a timeshare contract, please don't hesitate to reach out. You can contact us here .


By Primo Management Group 18 Sep, 2017
Have you ever been approached by someone with timeshares for sale? Or, have you read an ad looking for someone to buy one?
Oftentimes, timeshare salespeople play hard ball -- they woo you in initial meetings, give you "free" incentives such as gift cards or food, and then offer you a deal.
You might be attracted to the thought of having a resort-style membership available to you any time of the year. You and your family might be looking forward to long weeks at the beach in a timeshare or a place to escape to for long weekends.
Or, you may even feel pressured by the woo-tactics used by the salespeople, making you lean toward a decision you haven't fully thought through.
Should you buy into a timeshare that's for sale? The answer might surprise you.
Timeshares for Sale -- Why You Should Say No
Some people don't know how to say no to these ads or pitches. Many people aren't even aware that timeshares for sale usually aren't good deals.
There are multiple reasons why timeshares aren't a good investment; not only will you not actually own this property, but you'll also be susceptible to scams and hidden fees.
Here are five reasons why you should say no to timeshares for sale:
1. You Lose Money on Them
Wouldn't you love to have your money work smarter, not harder? That's the idea that many people are thinking when they make investments -- spend the money now and make more in return.
Many people think that timeshares are an investment. However, they aren't. Investments are buy-ins where you can expect a return in the future; timeshares don't promise this at all. In fact, they do the opposite!
Timeshares lose money. Once someone buys one, the value of it instantly plummets -- meaning it'll be nearly impossible to recover the initial costs, let alone profit off of it.
Buying into a timeshare means you are buying a property that you'll be dumping money into for no reason. In the short run, it may seem like a good idea to buy into timeshares for sale -- but in the long run, you'll see how you did nothing but waste your money on a property you didn't even fully own.
2. Hidden Fees in the Small Print
The property of your dreams can possible, especially with financial assistance for a down payment or to help make monthly payments.
When people can't pay for their timeshare up front, they oftentimes take out a mortgage to cover the costs. However, this isn't the only payments they'll be making.
Timeshares are notorious for having fees in the small print that are often not talked about during sales pitches. These fees can vary from property taxes, maintenance fees, insurance payments and even utilities. The average annual maintenance fee for a timeshare is $660 -- and that's to maintain a property that you probably only spend one to two weeks per year on the inside.
When adding up all of these fees, you will certainly end up paying more than you initially thought you were.
3. Hard to Schedule Time
If you and your family regularly vacation throughout the year, having consistent housing could be a dream. What's better than knowing exactly where you'll be staying each summer?
Contrary to what a salesperson may tell you, it's actually surprisingly difficult to schedule time for you and your family at a timeshare.
There are often many blackout dates included in your timeshare agreement . Aside from that, you may get locked into having your time at the location for the same one or two weeks every year.
This lack of flexibility can be quite frustrating -- if you can't go at the times available, then you paid for an entire year when you didn't even use the property. Talk about a loss!
4. Difficult to Rent Them Out
If you can't schedule your timeshare one year, considering renting it out could seem like the perfect solution.
However, it's oftentimes difficult to find someone willing to rent these properties out.
People are often wary of renting out timeshares -- they know they aren't good investments and worry about the extra fees that may be tacked on to their rent. If you were counting on someone temporarily taking it over for a year, you might want to reconsider.
Additionally, some timeshare agreements prohibit renting the spaces out to people who aren't on the agreement for it. You may think of risking it by renting it out to friends you know "under the table," but if you were caught, you could face hefty fines as a result.
5. Resell Difficulty and Scams
If you've fallen behind on your timeshare payments you may already be thinking of selling it for relief.
However, once you purchase a timeshare, it's incredibly difficult to get rid of it. Timeshares lose value after purchase, making buyers wary and reluctant in taking them off your hands.
Because of this, scammers have developed ways to take advantage of sellers looking to get out of the market. These scammers will promise to sell your timeshare in no time -- but will require you to pay hefty fees up front. They end up taking your money without selling it -- and you are left thousands of dollars in the hole and still stuck with your timeshare.
Considering the difficulty of reselling these properties, it's wise to not purchase one in the first place. Should anything happen and you fall behind on your mortgage payments, you can fall into foreclosure. This will affect your credit score and ability to get loans in the future -- which will make future housing purchases incredibly difficult.
Conclusion
Overall, timeshares for sale are becoming a thing of the past. Unless you and your family want to vacation on the same week every year, it may be better to walk away from the lengthy sales pitch or to ignore the ad.
Instead, consider planning vacations in advance -- it offers more flexibility, spontaneity and could save you money in the long run.
If you're still on the fence about whether or not a timeshare purchase is right for you, be sure to check out our blog here . We are always writing about why consumers should think twice about buying timeshares because we want them to know exactly what they're getting into.
Overall, just say no to timeshares -- you'll thank yourself later.
By Primo Management Group 14 Sep, 2017
Has your dream vacation property become a nightmare? Unfortunately, many nowadays find themselves with a timeshare property they can't afford.
Perhaps you bought it during better economic times. Maybe you no longer have the circumstances or desire to vacation in the same place every year. Or maybe you received the property through inheritance and never wanted it to begin with.
Whichever situation you find yourself in, you're now wondering how to offload the timeshare without losing any more money.
Read on to learn more about timeshare donation and resale options.
What Are My Options?
Many of the 7.9% of Americans who own a timeshare property are happy with their investment. Others, for various reasons, need to let theirs go.
If you fall into that category, what can you do? Here are the three most common solutions:
Timeshare resale. If your timeshare is in a highly desirable location, you may be able to resell it. However, since new timeshares are so readily available, there aren't too many people in the market for a used timeshare.
Timeshare donation. If you're unable to sell your timeshare, you may be able to donate it to charity. Alternately, you could gift it to a friend or family member who agrees to take over the maintenance fees.
Timeshare cancellation. If you can't sell it and don't want to donate it, a legitimate timeshare cancellation company may be able to legally free you of your timeshare.
Unfortunately, letting go of a timeshare almost always results in financial loss.
Contrary to what they told you at the timeshare presentation, most of these properties do not hold their value or gain equity. Some are worth only a fraction of what the buyer paid for them - perhaps less than the annual maintenance bills!
For this reason, the IRS classifies all timeshares as "worthless investments."
This doesn't mean your situation is hopeless. You just need to be realistic about what your timeshare is worth. It's also important to understand that you will probably not recoup some (or even most) of your investment.
Beware of Scams
Whether you're considering timeshare donation, resale, or cancellation, you need to be very careful of scams.
Sadly, many companies out there know how desperate you are to sell your timeshare. They know that the property is a financial drain. They know you're eager to get rid of it.
These scam companies often make big promises, offering to take your property off your hands for an upfront fee. In most cases, once they have your money you'll never hear from them again.
Then you're not only out the fee you paid, but you're still stuck with the timeshare.
Some companies take financial fraud one step further. They buy up timeshare properties and put them into a "shell" company created with the sole intention of filing bankruptcy.
How do you know if the company you're considering working with is legitimate? Here are a few red flags to watch out for:
Asking for large upfront fees
Unsolicited contact
Promises of profit
Promises of "eager buyers" waiting
No matter which route you choose to take with your timeshare, research the company carefully to ensure it's legitimate!
Pros and Cons of Timeshare Donation
If you do manage to find a legitimate timeshare donation company, there are a few things you should know before you proceed.
Some timeshare donation companies try to tell you that your entire donation is tax-deductible. The idea of a big tax break is appealing, which is why many dive in without second thought.
Let's get something clear, though. On the off-chance that yours is one of the very few properties that held or increased its value, you could end up with a decent tax write-off.
However, for the vast majority of timeshare holders, your property likely decreased in value. And no matter how much you paid for it, the IRS will only allow you to write off the current fair market value of the property.
Let's say you paid $25,000 for your beach bungalow in Mexico. Over the past few years, the market value plummeted and your timeshare is now worth only $2,500.
If you give this property away through timeshare donation, the price you originally paid for it is irrelevant. In this instance, your total allowable tax deduction would be the current market value of $2,500.
These numbers, sad to say, are still on the generous side. One company reports that many donated timeshare properties sell for as little as $50 .
The same company also noted that the average timeshare donation only generates about $400 to charities. If you truly care about philanthropy, you're better off sending a check to the charity of your choice.
Here are a few other facts worth noting:
Companies may employ their own property assessors to inflate the value of your property for tax purposes. This could haunt you down the road in the form of an IRS audit and hefty fines.
If your timeshare is worth very little, you may actually have to pay the company to take it from you.
Some companies won't consider timeshares that still have a mortgage or are behind on maintenance fees. They'll only take properties that are free and clear.
As you can see, there are many important factors to weigh when considering timeshare donation.
Final Thoughts
So, what are the pros and cons of timeshare donation? It's true that a legitimate company may be able to take your timeshare off your hands.
However, it will likely cost you a few thousand dollars in transfer fees. And regardless of what the company claims, you shouldn't count on a huge tax write-off for your donation.
If you're looking for an option with less risk, you may want to consider timeshare cancellation. At PMG, we're an attorney-backed agency that uses the power of the law to get you out of your timeshare contract.
Would you like to know more about how to legally get rid of your timeshare? We invite you to contact us for more information or to schedule a free consultation
By Primo Management Group 07 Sep, 2017
The timeshare industry is huge and still growing. In fact, between 2015 and 2016 the sales volume of the industry increased from $8.6 billion to $9.2 billion.
Timeshares can be attractive investments at first, but eventually, they may become a burden. In many cases, timeshare owners find themselves in financial trouble and the timeshare contract they are under needs to be relinquished. There are a number of ways to terminate a timeshare contract, but depending on your particular situation, it can be very tricky.
Some exit timeshare companies claim they can get individuals out of their contracts. They end up costing thousands of dollars and creating more headaches for the owner.
In some instances, an attorney may need to be involved in the process to ensure an individual is not taken advantage of and is fully released from their timeshare. Primo Management Group in Orlando, FL is your best option.
Consider the Rescission Period:
However, there are ways to exit timeshare contracts without the stress associated with exit timeshare companies or dealing directly with the resort. Below are some possibilities a timeshare owner can entertain if they need to get out of their contract.
Consider the Rescission Period
If you've recently purchased a timeshare and are now regretting your decision, you need to consider the rescission period.
Many people have buyer's remorse after purchasing a timeshare and can use this clause to cancel the contract early on. The rescission period refers to a short period of time after you have purchased the timeshare during which you can cancel your contract. Each contract is different and state laws can dictate rescission periods, so you'll need to check your contract in order to find out if this is available to you.
Unfortunately, using the rescission period to cancel the contract will only work for recently purchased timeshares. This is a technique that new buyers can utilize, but if you've owned a timeshare for a while, you'll need to try a different approach.
Donate Your Timeshare:
An option for those who are past the rescission period is to donate the timeshare to a charity or other organization. Charities typically need venues to hold annual events and your timeshare could provide the perfect location and atmosphere.
In some cases, charity organizations end up taking over responsibility of the payments from the owner to hold their annual events. This is a great way for the owner of a timeshare to relinquish the costs and stress of being under an unwanted contract.
This approach also carries the advantage of a tax deduction at the end of each year. This will help with contract and maintenance costs you have previously incurred.
Selling or Renting Your Timeshare:
Timeshares are notorious for having bad resale values, but often an owner just wants out. Even if you aren't getting a good price relative to what you paid, the peace of mind of getting out from under the contract may be worth it.
You'll need to consider a few things when trying to sell a timeshare. Location is a big factor. Many older resorts or condos are much harder to sell, as conditions have depreciated over the years and the need for maintenance is higher.
Additionally, if a resort is failing, they may not have enough profit coming in to properly maintain the units, making them unattractive to potential buyers. As the owner of a timeshare, you may be stuck with increasing maintenance fees on top of the annual price of the space.
Considering these factors is essential before deciding to sell a timeshare. Fortunately there are resources that you can utilize in order stay informed about your property. Websites like Sharket provide resale information and news regarding timeshares in different areas of the country.
If you're still having trouble selling a timeshare, renting is always an option. While this doesn't get you out of your contract completely, renting will cut some of the costs down and buy you time while waiting to sell.
Watch Out For Scams:
If you've decided to work with an exit timeshare company to sell your property, you need to watch out for scams, which are common in the timeshare industry. There are also a number of different scam tactics currently in use.
Always be weary of solicitations from agents or exit timeshare companies offering to help sell your timeshare. Quality organizations don't need to solicit their services. In order to get your business, many of these companies will insist they already have a possible buyer when in reality they're just trying to get your business.
Some scams involve individuals posing as a timeshare company. They claim to have received an offer on your timeshare, but in reality they are after your money. They may ask for money in order to get the ball rolling, but this is a scam.
Know the Law:
Timeshare companies want you to believe that once you have purchased a timeshare and are under a contract, there is no getting out. This is simply not the case!
As a result of litigation that has been filed against timeshare companies, specifically for fraudulent sales tactics, these companies have become more and more agreeable when it comes to releasing an owner from a contract. They don't want the stress and expense of litigation.
If you were promised by a salesperson that a timeshare would increase in value over time or that it could be openly sold or transferred, you may be legally able to get out of your contract. Some exit timeshare companies can help you with information regarding your legal rights, but a qualified attorney at Primo Management Group is your best bet.
Let a Timeshare Exit Professional Help You:
If you're under a timeshare contract and need out, you need to work with an organization that is knowledgeable of both the legal process and the real estate industry. At Primo Management Group in Orlando, FL, we excel in both of these areas.
Let us evaluate your case and provide the best possible solution for your situation. Contact us today.
By Primo Management Group 06 Sep, 2017
You stand in awe at the amazing view. You bask in the sun's warm glow from the balcony of a condo that could be yours.
Your vacation's almost over.
You've enjoyed the nightlife, the beaches, the golf and the shops. You wish you could live here on the Florida coast. But you live somewhere up north, where the winters get cold and the beaches aren't quite so inviting.
You're considering buying a timeshare from the company who gave you and your family this amazing experience for free.
But first you need to answer: How much do timeshares cost?
The timeshare business is a nearly $10 billion industry and the number of timeshare owners is growing year over year.
You want to make an informed decision, so let's explore real vs perceived timeshare cost.
The Initial Purchase
This will be the most straightforward number to consider when you're looking into how much do timeshares cost.
This "starter price" can vary based on several factors like:
Size
Location
Resort amenities that you'll share when using the timeshare
Age of the timeshare
Condition of the timeshare and property
If you're buying the timeshare new in one of those free vacation offers where you sit through a seminar, you can expect a price of about $10 thousand for a run of the mill timeshare.
A luxurious timeshare at a sought after resort could be closer to $40 thousand.
If you buy used like a unit sold on a website where people try to sell their timeshares, a more typical cost would be $1500.
Wow! That's is a nice round price that even someone on a modest income could afford. Can you really go on a luxury vacation every year for such a low price? That would pay for itself in just 1-2 years!
This is perceived cost for many people.
But as they say, if it seems to too good to be true,...
Annual Fees
In addition to the cost of the unit, you'll be responsible for paying for the normal things that you would pay for your own home:
Maintenance
Utilities, even when you're not there, if the unit spends time vacant
Landscaping
Amenities
Building staffing
Taxes
When looking into how much do timeshares cost, don't forget this important expense. You'll owe this even if you choose not to use the unit in a certain year due to life events or desire to go somewhere else.
The average is around $300-400.
If you use the unit during peak seasons, want flexibility in scheduling or own a larger share of the timeshare, then your annual cost could be $1000 or more.
You may be thinking, well, that's straightforward enough. I can handle that. But you should know that the timeshare company can increase your annual fee from year to year.
Regardless, of your life circumstances or income, you're obligated to pay whatever they ask.
Real Estate Fees
When you buy the unit, you'll be responsible for real estate fees similar to the closing costs on a house. These can vary greatly. They may include:
Appraisal fees
Transfer fees
Recording fees
When you initially look at your contract, it may clearly state "plus fees". But it's often unclear how much these fees will be until after you sign the contract.
Unexpected Fees
At this point you may still think that the real price matches up with what you thought timeshares cost. And that might not be so bad.
But there's more.
In addition, the resort that holds your timeshare may have storm damage, need to repave the parking lot or need a new roof. Rather than set a little of your annual fee aside to pay for these expenses, you'll get a bill for your share of the expense.
This could be anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand.
You'll then have a limited time to pay this unexpected cost. If you don't pay, you'll owe additional late fees.
And these kinds of upgrades and replacements are more frequent than you might think. If you happen into a resort that's poorly managed or struggling, these costs could skyrocket.
Other Expenses
Some people choose to try to find a renter to take over their timeshare when they can't use it. In theory this sounds great.
They might even pay you more than your annual fee.
But in reality, this almost always costs more than it's worth in both time and money, through things like:
Finder's fees
Brokerage fees
Credit check
Background check
Clean up after a tenant who is respectful of your property
Clean up after a tenant who is not
Cost of Getting Out of A Timeshare
The cost of getting out will depend on your contract. You could owe 10's of thousands of dollars or more in some cases. In some contracts, cancelling isn't an option after a certain date.
Some timeshare companies will put additional restrictions on how you sell your timeshare and assess fees if you break the rules.
So read your contract to reduce your exit costs.
It's important to understand that timeshares rarely, if ever, appreciate in value. When you sell your timeshare, it's highly unlikely that someone will pay anywhere close to what you paid for it. You can consider it a total loss in most instances.
It may even cost you more than you make in the sale in the form of:
Auction fees
Listing Fees
Real estate transfer fees
Credit check
And so on
Selling a timeshare isn't like selling a home. Basically you're asking — or begging — someone to take over your obligations to pay the annual fees because you can't afford it anymore. Timeshares can sell on eBay for as little as $1.
A property in a failing resort may be nearly impossible to sell. In these cases so many people are defaulting that they can't afford to keep the place up.
The Life Costs
Very briefly, we'd like to share some life costs that should be considered when you ask, how much do timeshares cost really?
For many, timeshares turn from a dream come true to a nightmare very fast. This can take a toll on your mental, physical and financial heath.
Each of these has a cost that may be harder to measure — but they're very real.
How Much Do Timeshares Cost Really?
Now it's time to really answer this question. More often than not, it's more than it's worth. Or it's more than you should have to pay.
Know your rights. You do have options. We can help you exit a timeshare contract in the most orderly and cost-effective way. Contact us today to schedule a free consultation.
By Primo Management Group 05 Sep, 2017
So many of us have been there. Someone catches us in a really great mood and we make a promise to do something.
Later, as we're coming down off that life high, we look back and go, "what the heck have I done?"
For many, this is what it feels like to own a timeshare. It seemed like a fantastic idea at the time — and maybe it was great for a few years. But as you continue to pay those maintenance and assessment bills year after year, that Florida dream vacation spot begins to feel like a nightmare.
But there are some very good reasons people like you should get rid of timeshares.
Let's explore why.
Vacations Have Become a Chore
Vacations are intended to rejuvenate you. You work hard at your job. Your kids work hard in school. All of you deserve time to unwind.
Studies show that people who vacation have reduced risk of heart disease, headaches, and insomnia. They also see improved productivity, creativity and sense of wellbeing once they get back.
But there are several reasons that vacations become a chore with a timeshare:
You can't anticipate the vacation. It's the same old spot. Nothing new. Nothing exciting. Nothing to look forward to.
You may have to take your vacation at inopportune times. You have to book well in advance or you have the same week year after year. There's very little flexibility. So you feel forced to take a vacation when it's not a good time for you.
The timeshare's starting to feel like an abusive relationship. You begin to resent your decision and don't want to see her/him anymore. But you feel like you have to visit anyway to get your money's worth.
You can't be spontaneous. You really want to take your spouse hiking at Machu Picchu this year. But you can't do both. You feel obligated to go to the timeshare. That's not a vacation.
You Can't Afford it Anymore
Maybe you've recently been laid off, aren't making as much as you used to or just don't have the disposable income you once had. Perhaps you really want to put more toward retirement. Or you're going through a divorce and own a timeshare.
Your timeshare may be breaking you — little by little.
Yes, it's nice to have. But you really need to have more flexibility in how you spend your money.
You Feel Deceived
If you feel misled into buying a timeshare, not only does it make vacation time miserable. It drags the rest of your life down with it.
Your inner voice is telling you that you made a bad decision. Those close to you may echo that voice.
You may have been promised flexibility that just isn't there. Maybe you were told that this was a money maker. All you have to do is find renters for the week and charge them more to make a profit.
Maybe the company isn't keeping up their side of the deal and the condo is going into decline.
People should get rid of timeshares that aren't what they were promised.
More Stress Than It's Worth
Your timeshare needs a new roof. It flooded during the hurricane. Vandals broke in and smashed the place up.
Or maybe you're playing the renter's game, trying to attract, screen and manage renters from another state.
Stress isn't just a feeling. It does serious damage to your health in the form of:
Stomach upset
Coronary disease
Overeating
Smoking/Bad habits/Addictions to find relief
Reduced lifespan
Depression
Anger
In addition, your relationships pay the toll. A Berkeley study found that stress had a significant impact on relationships. They found that external stresses like financial and work stress made people less satisfied in their relationships.
It's just not worth it. And when getting rid of timeshares is an option, it should be taken rather than enduring this any longer.
Cutting Losses Is Better Than Continuing to Pay
What are you putting into your timeshare? What else could you be doing with that money?
You could:
Take vacations that you actually enjoy
Invest that money in a mutual fund and actually make a return on your investment
Buy a new car that you've been holding off on to make sure you can cover timeshare payments
Send your parents on a vacation to a place they've always dreamed of visiting -- not the timeshare because it's convenient.
There are lots of opportunities to make smarter choices with your money when it's not tied up in a timeshare.
When you cancel your timeshare, you'll likely need to sell it. And this may mean selling it for what you paid for it without regard to all you've put in since. Or selling a less than you paid for it. You may also have cancelation fees.
But when you do the math, even if you take a loss, it's better than continuing to pay into something that doesn't "love you back".
But can people really get rid of timeshares?
It's Possible to Break Free from Your Timeshare
Canceling a timeshare isn't easy. Depending on how long you've had the timeshare, reasons you want to cancel and what's actually in your contract, the timeshare company could:
Put strict restrictions on you that make it hard or impossible to sell
Charge you exorbitant cancelation fees
Make it difficult to rent it out if you choose that option
In addition to this, scammers could perceive you as an easy target who's desperate to get out.
Getting rid of timeshares can be a drawn out and costly process. But it doesn't have to be. It's possible to be free without losing an arm and a leg. We can show you how.
Get Rid of Timeshares the Right Way
To get rid of timeshares after the cancellation period has passed, you need to have a plan and knowledge about the timeshare cancellation process.
This may seem like something that you can just learn on the Internet. But it takes in depth research, negotiating skills and experience in timeshare cancellations.
Having an advocate on your side will save you time, money and stress that you would endure otherwise.
We know what we're talking about because we've helped thousands get rid of timeshares. If you're feeling stuck in your timeshare and are ready to be free, contact us today for a free consultation.
By Primo Management Group 14 Aug, 2017
Timeshares can be an attractive option for folks who love taking vacations.
Timeshare owners can lock in future trips at today's prices. They also might give travelers access to a variety of onsite amenities. These are some of the reasons that the timeshare industry grew by 7% last year.
But in some cases, people end up with a timeshare they no longer want. Perhaps they purchased it on impulse and didn't consider the cost of the maintenance fees. Or they might have inherited a timeshare that they don't want to keep.
While timeshare cancellation can be complicated, it doesn't have to bankrupt you.
If you have a Florida timeshare you're looking to exit, keep reading to find out what steps you'll need to take.
Right to Timeshare Cancellation Laws in Florida
Many consumers purchase timeshares during a high-pressure sales pitch. The company offers a deal that they claim is only available for one day. Then, if you reject the pitch, they offer additional incentives to make the package seem more desirable.
In many cases, the buyer doesn't realize what all of the fine print entails until after they sign the contract. Once they've had time to reflect, they start experiencing buyer's remorse and wonder if it's too late to get out of the deal.
Laws regarding timeshare cancellation vary from state to state. Some states only allow for cancellation under certain circumstances. Other states only give consumers 3 business days after signing to cancel their timeshare.
Luckily, Florida has some of the most consumer-friendly timeshare cancellation laws in the country.
In Florida, consumers have 10 calendar days to cancel their timeshare. The timeline is calculated from either the day the contract is signed or the day the buyer received all required documents, whichever occurred later.
Canceling Your Timeshare
Cancellations that fall within the 10-day cancellation period are the easiest to process. If you decide to cancel your timeshare, you will need to notify the seller.
Requests for timeshare cancellation must be submitted to the seller in writing. Make sure your letter includes your legal name as it appears on the contract, as well as your phone number, address, and email. You should also include the name of the timeshare company, the date you purchased the timeshare, and a statement that you are canceling the contract.
Check your contract for instructions on sending the timeshare cancellation letter. For example, some contracts require that the letter is sent by certified mail. If you don't follow the instructions listed in the contract, the seller may be able to argue that your cancellation is invalid.
The seller is then required to refund all payments either 20 days after they receive or written notice or 5 days after the funds from your check have cleared. Whichever event occurs later will be used as the standard.
In some cases, buyers receive incentives as part of the timeshare package they purchase. If you cancel your timeshare, the value of these incentives will be subtracted from your refund.
Canceling Afer the Cancellation Period
Once the cancellation period has passed, canceling the timeshare becomes more complicated. When you purchase a timeshare, you are signing a contract that you are legally required to uphold. That said, it is still possible to get out of the contract.
Obligations of the Timeshare Seller
Under Florida law, timeshare sellers must meet certain disclosure obligations. If these obligations are not fulfilled, it may be easier to get out of your contract.
Together, these disclosures are called the "Public Offering Statement." This statement is a detailed history of the timeshare property or program that you're buying into.
At a minimum, the public offering statement should include a description of the timeshare and the duration of the timeshare. It should also indicate whether the purchaser will have any interest in an actual property, and should detail what accommodations the timeshare holder is entitled to.
Finally, the disclosure must outline how the seller apportions shared expenses among timeshare holders. Failing to include any of this information could make the contract invalid.
When to Consult an Attorney
In most cases, canceling a timeshare after the cancellation period will require legal action, and maybe even a lawsuit. Consulting with an attorney is your best bet in this situation. Make sure to choose a lawyer who has experience working with contracts in general and timeshares specifically.
An experienced attorney will be able to navigate consumer protection laws on your behalf. Also, an attorney might be able to identify a loophole in your contract that renders the agreement void. This is the most effective way to be relieved of your contractual obligations.
In rare cases, you may even be able to recover some of the money you have already invested. Keep in mind, however, that it is very difficult to recover funds from a timeshare company after the cancellation period has passed.
What if You're in Foreclosure?
Since timeshares typically cost upwards of $20,000, most people do not pay for them in cash. Instead, they take out a mortgage that they make monthly payments on. These payments are in addition to a yearly maintenance fee.
But just like with a mortgage on a home, there are consequences if you don't make your monthly payments on your timeshare. If you fall behind on payments, your timeshare will go into foreclosure.
There are two types of foreclosure: judicial and nonjudicial. Judicial foreclosures are settled through a court, whereas nonjudicial foreclosures are settled out of court.
Luckily, in the state of Florida, timeshare foreclosures are handled through a nonjudicial process. So, if you go into foreclosure on your timeshare, you can settle the issue with the seller out of court. Typically, when you enter foreclosure, the seller will send you a notice that they intend to resell your timeshare, and then they will place it up for auction.
While this might seem like an easy way to get out of your timeshare, it's not necessarily that simple. Foreclosing on a timeshare will tank your credit score. For this reason, it's much better to consult with an attorney before it gets to this point.
Get help
If you need help with timeshare cancellation, contact us . Our timeshare exit experts will work with you to make sure your rights as a consumer are protected.
By Primo Management Group 07 Aug, 2017
Have you ever been approached by someone with timeshares for sale? Or, have you read an ad looking for someone to buy one?
Oftentimes, timeshare salespeople play hard ball -- they woo you in initial meetings, give you "free" incentives such as gift cards or food, and then offer you a deal.
You might be attracted to the thought of having a resort-style membership available to you any time of the year. You and your family might be looking forward to long weeks at the beach in a timeshare or a place to escape to for long weekends.
Or, you may even feel pressured by the woo-tactics used by the salespeople, making you lean toward a decision you haven't fully thought through.
Should you buy into a timeshare that's for sale? The answer might surprise you.
Timeshares for Sale -- Why You Should Say No
Some people don't know how to say no to these ads or pitches. Many people aren't even aware that timeshares for sale usually aren't good deals.
There are multiple reasons why timeshares aren't a good investment; not only will you not actually own this property, but you'll also be susceptible to scams and hidden fees.
Here are five reasons why you should say no to timeshares for sale:
1. You Lose Money on Them
Wouldn't you love to have your money work smarter, not harder? That's the idea that many people are thinking when they make investments -- spend the money now and make more in return.
Many people think that timeshares are an investment. However, they aren't. Investments are buy-ins where you can expect a return in the future; timeshares don't promise this at all. In fact, they do the opposite!
Timeshares lose money. Once someone buys one, the value of it instantly plummets -- meaning it'll be nearly impossible to recover the initial costs, let alone profit off of it.
Buying into a timeshare means you are buying a property that you'll be dumping money into for no reason. In the short run, it may seem like a good idea to buy into timeshares for sale -- but in the long run, you'll see how you did nothing but waste your money on a property you didn't even fully own.
2. Hidden Fees in the Small Print
The property of your dreams can possible, especially with financial assistance for a down payment or to help make monthly payments.
When people can't pay for their timeshare up front, they oftentimes take out a mortgage to cover the costs. However, this isn't the only payments they'll be making.
Timeshares are notorious for having fees in the small print that are often not talked about during sales pitches. These fees can vary from property taxes, maintenance fees, insurance payments and even utilities. The average annual maintenance fee for a timeshare is $660 -- and that's to maintain a property that you probably only spend one to two weeks per year on the inside.
When adding up all of these fees, you will certainly end up paying more than you initially thought you were.
3. Hard to Schedule Time
If you and your family regularly vacation throughout the year, having consistent housing could be a dream. What's better than knowing exactly where you'll be staying each summer?
Contrary to what a salesperson may tell you, it's actually surprisingly difficult to schedule time for you and your family at a timeshare.
There are often many blackout dates included in your timeshare agreement. Aside from that, you may get locked into having your time at the location for the same one or two weeks every year.
This lack of flexibility can be quite frustrating -- if you can't go at the times available, then you paid for an entire year when you didn't even use the property. Talk about a loss!
4. Difficult to Rent Them Out
If you can't schedule your timeshare one year, considering renting it out could seem like the perfect solution.
However, it's oftentimes difficult to find someone willing to rent these properties out.
People are often wary of renting out timeshares -- they know they aren't good investments and worry about the extra fees that may be tacked on to their rent. If you were counting on someone temporarily taking it over for a year, you might want to reconsider.
Additionally, some timeshare agreements prohibit renting the spaces out to people who aren't on the agreement for it. You may think of risking it by renting it out to friends you know "under the table," but if you were caught, you could face hefty fines as a result.
5. Resell Difficulty and Scams
If you've fallen behind on your timeshare payments you may already be thinking of selling it for relief.
However, once you purchase a timeshare, it's incredibly difficult to get rid of it. Timeshares lose value after purchase, making buyers wary and reluctant in taking them off your hands.
Because of this, scammers have developed ways to take advantage of sellers looking to get out of the market. These scammers will promise to sell your timeshare in no time -- but will require you to pay hefty fees up front. They end up taking your money without selling it -- and you are left thousands of dollars in the hole and still stuck with your timeshare.
Considering the difficulty of reselling these properties, it's wise to not purchase one in the first place. Should anything happen and you fall behind on your mortgage payments, you can fall into foreclosure. This will affect your credit score and ability to get loans in the future -- which will make future housing purchases incredibly difficult.
Conclusion
Overall, timeshares for sale are becoming a thing of the past. Unless you and your family want to vacation on the same week every year, it may be better to walk away from the lengthy sales pitch or to ignore the ad.
Instead, consider planning vacations in advance -- it offers more flexibility, spontaneity and could save you money in the long run.
If you're still on the fence about whether or not a timeshare purchase is right for you, be sure to check out our blog here. We are always writing about why consumers should think twice about buying timeshares because we want them to know exactly what they're getting into.
Overall, just say no to timeshares -- you'll thank yourself later.
By Primo Management Group 03 Aug, 2017
Tempted to invest in a timeshare? The thought of owning a holiday home may seem appealing but it has its drawbacks.
Once you sign the contract, it's hard to go back. Unless you keep up with the payments, you'll face foreclosure.
For many customers, investing in timeshares is an impulsive decision. They're blinded by the stunning landscapes and low costs. Unfortunately, these deals involve year-round responsibility and hidden fees.
The average sales price of timeshares in the U.S. was $22,240 in 2015. That's considerably less than buying your own apartment or home. However, there are other fees you need to be aware of.
Considering that most Americans spend $250 to $271 per night when traveling abroad, timeshares look like a good investment. Yet, the risks remain high.
Let's see how timeshare deals work and whether they're right for you!
Timeshare Deals at a Glance
Timeshare programs have been around since 1969. They usually involve vacation properties ranging in size from studio units to villas.
Compared to hotel rooms, these properties are more luxurious and comfortable.
The most popular ones are located near beaches and theme park resorts. You can also purchase a timeshare close to ski or golf resorts.
This type of property is furnished and offers everything you need to feel like home. It's no need to buy a TV, kitchen utensils, or appliances. The maintenance fees are split among owners.
When you sign up for a timeshare, you buy the rights to use the property. It's not the same as fractional ownership. In this case, you actually own a fraction of the property's title.
How Do Timeshares Work?
Most timeshare deals are now offered by reputable hospitality chains, such as Hyatt and Disney. This helped the industry become more transparent. In 2014, more than 9.1 million households in America owned a vacation property.
The cost of a timeshare is supported by multiple parties. Each owner can use the property for at least one week per year. Depending on your needs, you can opt for different types of timeshares:
Fixed week - This option allows you to use the property for the same week each year.
Right-To-Use - The parties can lease a property for several weeks each year for a set amount of years.
Floating - With this arrangement, you're free to choose the time of the year when you'll use the property.
Points Club - You can earn points and use them each year for booking timeshare properties.
Most timeshare deals give customers the flexibility to rent their part of the property.
For instance, if you're not able to use the property in a given year, you can rent it to a friend.
How Much Does It Cost?
Contrary to popular belief, timeshares are not cheap.
The costs depend on the property size, location, and amenities. You can expect to pay more or less based on the time of the year when you'll book the accommodation.
Fees are based on the type of timeshare and may include:
Buy-in costs
Timeshare maintenance fees (utilities, landscaping, upgrades, and more)
Broker commission
Membership fees
Reservation fees
Exchange company fees
Trustee fees
Closing fees
Finance receivables
Each year, timeshare owners pay about $660 in maintenance fees.
The average price for one week can exceed $19,000. Even if you don't use the property, you still need to pay for maintenance.
Additionally, it's necessary to support your travel costs. Unless the property is nearby, you must pay for flight tickets. If you're only allowed to use the timeshare in peak season, the costs add up.
The Cons of a Timeshare
Without a doubt, timeshares have their perks. Unfortunately, the risks outweigh the benefits.
First of all, you might need to get a mortgage to afford this kind of luxury. Timeshares are usually marketed to those who can't afford them.
Secondly, the costs of timeshare ownership can easily exceed your budget. Besides maintenance fees, there are special taxes, assessment fees, and brokerage fees involved.
According to USA Today, maintenance fees can increase by as much as 12 percent each year. If you choose a more expensive location, such as New York, these annual costs can be as high as $1,200.
Another thing to consider is that sales people may not tell you the whole truth. They will emphasize the benefits and conceal the real costs. Most times, you sign the contract for life.
Assuming that you're able to sell your part, you'll still lose money.
Just like cars, timeshares lose their value over time. Compared to traditional properties, they don't increase in value.
It's enough to do a quick search on eBay to find timeshares available for a few dollars. Many times, owners are willing to sell them for next to nothing just to get rid of monthly payments.
Think about what happens if you have a bad year and can't go on a holiday. Like it or not, you still need to pay for the timeshare.
What if you opt for fixed ownership?
This means you must spend your vacation at the same time in the same place each year. No matter how much you love the place, you'll get bored sooner or later.
A more flexible timeshare isn’t necessarily better. You might not be able to trade times and locations as you wish.
Moreover, buying this kind of property in a foreign country has its challenges. For instance, Mexico doesn't allow foreigners to buy properties along the coast.
As you see, timeshare deals carry lots of risks. There are better ways to spend on travel and plan your dream holiday.
Alternatives to Timeshares
Nowadays, most hotels and holiday resorts offer fantastic deals. You can always check travel comparison sites for hidden gems. Additionally, most hotels offer discounts to those who book longer stays.
If you're on a tight budget, opt for B&Bs or short-term apartment apartments. Don’t forget about credit card rewards and last-minute deals!
Another option is joining a vacation club. This type of membership provides access to properties worldwide. You're not forced to pay maintenance fees or travel on specific dates.
Have you ever owned a timeshare? What was your experience like? Share your story below!
By Primo Management Group 25 Jul, 2017
The good news is that the divorce rate in the United States has seen a steady drop in recent years. Marriage rates have been up and divorce rates enjoyed a 40-year low.
Still, the hard truth is that not all marriages work. Getting a divorce settlement that is fair and just for both parties is a necessity when a marriage doesn't work any longer.
One of the biggest challenges in a divorce settlement is often timeshare ownership. That fun purchase you and your spouse made while on a vacation years back can prove a stubborn sticking point when divorce is looming.
In fact, you may have an iron clad agreement for your divorce settlement on everything but the timeshare.
Worried how to factor in your timeshare to your divorce? Here's what you need to know:
Getting a Fair Appraisal
One of the problems with a timeshare in a divorce settlement is the appraisal. As you know since you purchased the timeshare, maintenance fees can rise steadily with a timeshare.
Most couples are searching for an agreement that frees them both from the marriage agreement. A settlement that includes long-term repayments for the possible liabilities is often uncomfortable.
Make sure to be careful and check with the Better Business Bureau before choosing an appraiser. There has been a precedent of timeshare appraisal schemes and getting fraudulent information will only make your divorce more complicated.
As with any other part of your shared estate, the timeshare ownership is shared property. It will be treated accordingly by the legal system.
You may even want to get an expert independent appraisal to try and factor in the issues prior to making any agreement.
A Timeshare Is a Property
Just as a owned home or a summer house is considered property, so too is a timeshare. And just with any other real estate transaction, the property may be worth more or less than what the original purchase price was.
With your home, you may find you have a mortgage that is underwater. The same could be true in some respects when it comes to making decisions about a timeshare.
Either way, this property is shared until the divorce settlement is final. Understanding demand and market trends will help you and your legal team make informed decisions about your preference for the timeshare.
You Have Options
Just as with any other piece of property, there are 3 main options when it comes to factoring your timeshare into a settlement for your divorce.
These options are:
You award the property to your spouse
You retain the timeshare
You decide to sell
And just like every other facet of a divorce, there are nuances that can affect the settlement when it comes to timeshares.
You Award the Property
What could be more simple? You decide to grant the timeshare property to your spouse.
In many cases, a timeshare is a valued property. We are in a new era of timeshare ownership that includes treasured memories and a special bond to a place.
Your spouse may want to continue to take your children to that special spot or love the property and the vacation potential.
But in other cases, the timeshare may not be wanted. You could be offering something with little value that is seen as a liability.
You Keep the Property
As we all know, not every divorce is simply about dollars and sense. Emotions run high and the stresses of ending a life partnership can get the best of one or both properties.
You and your spouse may be dealing with the emotional attachments as well as the financial worth of the timeshare. Or, the timeshare might be so ingrained in every other part of the divorce settlement it is nearly impossible to make a clear decision.
Know that if you keep the property there are risks involved. No one should get a timeshare award outright as part of a divorce without calculating the long-term costs.
While any property has liabilities and issues this can be especially true of a timeshare.
You Sell the Property
We all know of cases where a family is so attached to a home they fight bitterly over the property during a divorce. Sometimes neither spouse is willing to budge and they have to relent and sell the property, splitting the proceeds of the sale.
In these cases, where both parties can't agree, there are few other options. But when it comes to timeshare ownership the option to sell is not always so cut and dried.
Couples find that the market is not always kind to timeshare sales. Take a quick search and you may find owners selling for a dollar just to get out from under the maintenance fees.
This is why many opt to dissolve the timeshare altogether. And also, the difficulties of selling are why it is so important to understand the liabilities and assets of the property.
An Asset Vs. A Liability in a Divorce Settlement
One of the more frustrating features of factoring your timeshare ownership into your divorce settlement is coming to understand the value of the timeshare itself.
Unfortunately, with escalating timeshare maintenance fees, the real cost of ownership can be difficult to pin down. In many cases, you and your spouse may find you are arguing over a liability rather than an asset when it comes to timeshare ownership in a divorce settlement.
Even if you have a capable lawyer they may be at a loss on how to calculate your timeshare's value.
Get the Help You Need
In fact, in many cases, you may find it makes more sense to dissolve your ownership in a timeshare altogether rather than including it in a divorce settlement.
Neither you or your spouse wants to inherit a liability in a divorce agreement. But how can you know the full implications of your timeshare ownership?
Further, is it possible to get out if you need to? The team at Primo Management Group helps couples make tough decisions about their timeshares every day.
We can help free you from your timeshare contract. Contact us now to schedule a free consultation.
 
By Primo Management Group 24 Jul, 2017
We've all been there. You're relaxing at an ideal locale, enjoying welcoming weather, live entertainment, good food. You're in your happy place.  
Just when you think things can't get any better, someone offers you a free gift merely to listen to an opportunity to own a piece of this luxury.
For many, a timeshare property is an attractive alternative to maintaining a costly second home. In fact, according to the American Resort Development, timeshare sales have increased by more than 34% since 2012.
But perhaps you are having second thoughts. Or, somewhere down the road, your circumstances or vacation habits have changed.
Maybe annual maintenance fees or unexpected assessments have become too much? What can you do if your timeshare contract no longer serves your needs?
If your dream has turned into your albatross, you may be wondering about contract termination. This can be a complicated issue.  
Timeshare Contract Termination
First, are you within your "cooling off" period? The phrase, "cooling off," is part of the Uniform Consumer Sales Practices Act, which most (if not all) states have adopted in some form.
Consumer law acknowledges that sometimes people make emotional decisions when wooed by salespeople. Laws geared toward consumer protection provide a certain time period to terminate the timeshare contract without incident (which is sometimes referred to as "rescission.")
This cooling off period varies by state. A few of the most popular states for timeshares: Nevada's timeshare statute provides five calendar days. In Florida, which is home to 22.7% of US timeshares, the law provides 10 days.
Rescission under Tennessee law must take place within 15 days.
Are You Out of Time for Timeshare Contract Termination?
Granted, the easiest method of contract termination happens within the statutory cooling off period. But even if you are outside of that window, you may have other options.
The laws of some states have provisions specifically for timeshare contracts that protect consumers in some circumstances. In other cases, general principles of contract termination may apply.
Some of the possible common law basis for contract termination are:
Ambiguity
Fraud
Mistake
Violation of Public Policy
Lack of Capacity
Duress
Ambiguity
One common contract doctrine is that of contract interpretation. If there is any ambiguity in your contract concerning your rights, the ambiguity is interpreted by the court or arbitrator against the person who prepared the contract.
Fraud
There are two kinds of fraud. One is a situation where someone signs a document believing it to be something other than what it is. While the law presumes that you would not sign a contract without reading it first, you may be able to show fraud if a sales agent handed you a document to sign and told you it was something that it wasn't.
The other type of fraud is a situation where someone signs a contract because of some false information provided by the person seeking to enforce the contract.  The party seeking to get out of the contract would not have signed the contract, but for the false information that induced them to sign it.  
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently returned thousands of dollars to victims of a timeshare resale scam. Deceptive and misleading conduct is not the norm, but it is grounds for contract termination when it happens.
Mistake
There are two kinds of mistake: a unilateral mistake and a mutual mistake. A unilateral mistake is where one of the parties was mistaken as to an essential fact on which the contract was based (such as the specific property being conveyed).
Ordinarily, a unilateral mistake is not grounds for contract termination. The doctrine of caveat emptor ("let the buyer beware") applies.
A mutual mistake of fact occurs when both parties were mistaken. In this situation, one or both of the parties may be able to terminate the contract.
Violation of Public Policy
Public policy usually involves matters of public health and safety. If your timeshare is a threat to health or safety, or if enforcing the contract would be contrary to the public good, this could be grounds for contract termination.
Lack of Capacity
"Capacity" refers to one's ability to understand what he or she is signing.
Minors are generally deemed to lack "capacity" to enter into a contract and, in most cases, would be able to terminate a contract on that basis. Mental impairment could also be a lack of capacity.
Voluntary intoxication (which sometimes happens on vacation), could be a lack of capacity depending on state laws and your particular circumstances. Literacy and language barriers are other factors used to determine someone's capacity to contract.
Duress
Duress is rarely found by courts and arbitrators because even high-pressure sales tactics usually do not rise to the level of duress needed to get out of the contract. If you believe that you were forced into signing a contract, you should speak with an attorney about whether you can use this to prevent enforcement of the contract.
Contract Termination Through Arbitration
The laws that pertain to your case will be the laws of the state where the timeshare is located. (And not the state where you live.) This is standard among timeshare contracts.  
Something else to look for is whether you can pursue a contract termination in court, or whether you are required to use binding arbitration. In some states, it is lawful for a company to ask a consumer to waive their right to a jury trial in the event of a dispute.
What If Contract Termination Is Not Possible?
Depending on the type of timeshare you have, you may be able to sell it.
If you own a deed, for example, some timeshare companies may accept it in lieu of foreclosing for unpaid maintenance fees. Sometimes higher-end timeshare companies will broker a sale, albeit with a commission to be paid by the seller. If you sell timeshare property without paying commission, be mindful of any restrictions and transfer fees.
Conclusion
Getting out from under an oppressive timeshare contract is a tricky matter. Are you looking for an attorney for timeshare contract termination? Contact us today for a free consultation.
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